Invisible PROMPT2

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
24 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Invisible PROMPT2

Thomas Munro-5
Hello hackers,

From the advanced bikeshedding department: I'd like my psql
transcripts to have the usual alignment, but be easier to copy and
paste later without having weird prompt stuff in the middle.  How
about a prompt format directive %w that means "whitespace of the same
width as %/"?  Then you can make set your PROMPT2 to '%w   ' and it
becomes invisible:

pgdu=# create table foo (
         i int,
         j int
       );
CREATE TABLE
pgdu=#

invisible-database.patch (1K) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Pavel Stehule


st 13. 11. 2019 v 4:15 odesílatel Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> napsal:
Hello hackers,

From the advanced bikeshedding department: I'd like my psql
transcripts to have the usual alignment, but be easier to copy and
paste later without having weird prompt stuff in the middle.  How
about a prompt format directive %w that means "whitespace of the same
width as %/"?  Then you can make set your PROMPT2 to '%w   ' and it
becomes invisible:

pgdu=# create table foo (
         i int,
         j int
       );
CREATE TABLE
pgdu=#

+1

Pavel
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Dagfinn Ilmari Mannsåker
In reply to this post by Thomas Munro-5
Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:

> Hello hackers,
>
> From the advanced bikeshedding department: I'd like my psql
> transcripts to have the usual alignment, but be easier to copy and
> paste later without having weird prompt stuff in the middle.  How
> about a prompt format directive %w that means "whitespace of the same
> width as %/"?  Then you can make set your PROMPT2 to '%w   ' and it
> becomes invisible:

That only lines up nicely if %/ is the only variable-width directive in
PROMPT1.  How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?

- ilmari
--
"The surreality of the universe tends towards a maximum" -- Skud's Law
"Never formulate a law or axiom that you're not prepared to live with
 the consequences of."                              -- Skud's Meta-Law


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Tom Lane-2
[hidden email] (Dagfinn Ilmari =?utf-8?Q?Manns=C3=A5ker?=) writes:
> Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:
>> From the advanced bikeshedding department: I'd like my psql
>> transcripts to have the usual alignment, but be easier to copy and
>> paste later without having weird prompt stuff in the middle.  How
>> about a prompt format directive %w that means "whitespace of the same
>> width as %/"?  Then you can make set your PROMPT2 to '%w   ' and it
>> becomes invisible:

> That only lines up nicely if %/ is the only variable-width directive in
> PROMPT1.

Yeah, that was my first reaction too.

> How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?

Or just define %w as meaning "whitespace of the same width as
PROMPT1".  You couldn't use it *in* PROMPT1, then, but I see
no use-case for that anyway.

                        regards, tom lane


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

David Fetter
On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:

> [hidden email] (Dagfinn Ilmari =?utf-8?Q?Manns=C3=A5ker?=) writes:
> > Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:
> >> From the advanced bikeshedding department: I'd like my psql
> >> transcripts to have the usual alignment, but be easier to copy and
> >> paste later without having weird prompt stuff in the middle.  How
> >> about a prompt format directive %w that means "whitespace of the same
> >> width as %/"?  Then you can make set your PROMPT2 to '%w   ' and it
> >> becomes invisible:
>
> > That only lines up nicely if %/ is the only variable-width directive in
> > PROMPT1.
>
> Yeah, that was my first reaction too.
>
> > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?
>
> Or just define %w as meaning "whitespace of the same width as
> PROMPT1".  You couldn't use it *in* PROMPT1, then, but I see
> no use-case for that anyway.

+1 for doing it this way.  Would it make more sense to error out if
somebody tried to set that in PROMPT1, or ignore it, or...?

Best,
David.
--
David Fetter <david(at)fetter(dot)org> http://fetter.org/
Phone: +1 415 235 3778

Remember to vote!
Consider donating to Postgres: http://www.postgresql.org/about/donate


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Chapman Flack
On 11/13/19 12:49 PM, David Fetter wrote:
>> Or just define %w as meaning "whitespace of the same width as
>> PROMPT1".  You couldn't use it *in* PROMPT1, then, but I see
>> no use-case for that anyway.
>
> +1 for doing it this way.  Would it make more sense to error out if
> somebody tried to set that in PROMPT1, or ignore it, or...?

Define it as "difference between PROMPT1's width and the total width
of non-%w elements in this prompt". Then it has a defined meaning in
PROMPT1 too (which could be arbitrary if it appears only once, but
has to be zero in case it appears more than once).

Easter egg: expand it to backspaces if used in PROMPT2 among other
stuff that's already wider than PROMPT1. ;)

Regards,
-Chap


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Alvaro Herrera-9
In reply to this post by David Fetter
On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:

> On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:

> > > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?
> >
> > Or just define %w as meaning "whitespace of the same width as
> > PROMPT1".  You couldn't use it *in* PROMPT1, then, but I see
> > no use-case for that anyway.
>
> +1 for doing it this way.  Would it make more sense to error out if
> somebody tried to set that in PROMPT1, or ignore it, or...?

This seems way too specific to me.  I like the "circumfix" directive
better, because it allows one to do more things.  I don't have any
immediate use for it, but it doesn't seem completely far-fetched that
there are some.

BTW the psql manual says that %[ and %] were plagiarized from tcsh, but
that's a lie: tcsh does not contain such a feature.  Bash does, however.
(I guess not many people read the tcsh manual.)

Neither bash nor tcsh have a feature to return whitespace of anything;
we're in a green field here ISTM.

--
Álvaro Herrera                https://www.2ndQuadrant.com/
PostgreSQL Development, 24x7 Support, Remote DBA, Training & Services


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

David Fetter
On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:06:08PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:

> On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
>
> > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:
>
> > > > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > > > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?
> > >
> > > Or just define %w as meaning "whitespace of the same width as
> > > PROMPT1".  You couldn't use it *in* PROMPT1, then, but I see
> > > no use-case for that anyway.
> >
> > +1 for doing it this way.  Would it make more sense to error out if
> > somebody tried to set that in PROMPT1, or ignore it, or...?
>
> This seems way too specific to me.  I like the "circumfix" directive
> better, because it allows one to do more things.  I don't have any
> immediate use for it, but it doesn't seem completely far-fetched that
> there are some.
>
> BTW the psql manual says that %[ and %] were plagiarized from tcsh, but
> that's a lie: tcsh does not contain such a feature.  Bash does, however.
> (I guess not many people read the tcsh manual.)
>
> Neither bash nor tcsh have a feature to return whitespace of anything;
> we're in a green field here ISTM.

So something like %w[...%w] where people could put things like PROMPT1
inside?

Best,
David.
--
David Fetter <david(at)fetter(dot)org> http://fetter.org/
Phone: +1 415 235 3778

Remember to vote!
Consider donating to Postgres: http://www.postgresql.org/about/donate


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Alvaro Herrera-9
On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:

> On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:06:08PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:
> > On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
> >
> > > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:
> >
> > > > > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > > > > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?

> > This seems way too specific to me.  I like the "circumfix" directive
> > better, because it allows one to do more things.  I don't have any
> > immediate use for it, but it doesn't seem completely far-fetched that
> > there are some.

> So something like %w[...%w] where people could put things like PROMPT1
> inside?

Hmm, (I'm not sure your proposed syntax works, but let's assume that
it does.)  I'm saying you'd define
\set PROMPT1 '%a%b%c '
\set PROMPT2 '%w[%a%b%c %w]'

and you'd end up with matching indentation on multiline queries.

I'm not sure that we'd need to make something like this work:
  PROMPT1="%w[$PROMPT1%w]"
which I think is what you're saying.


We already have "%:PROMPT1:" but that expands to the literal value of
prompt1, not to the value that prompt1 would expand to:

55432 13devel 11214=# \set PROMPT2 'hello %:PROMPT1: bye'
55432 13devel 11214=# select<Enter>
hello %[%033[35m%]%> %:VERSION_NAME: %p%[%033[0m%]%R%#  bye

--
Álvaro Herrera                https://www.2ndQuadrant.com/
PostgreSQL Development, 24x7 Support, Remote DBA, Training & Services


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

David Fetter
On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:58:38PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:

> On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
>
> > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:06:08PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:
> > > On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
> > >
> > > > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:
> > >
> > > > > > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > > > > > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?
>
> > > This seems way too specific to me.  I like the "circumfix" directive
> > > better, because it allows one to do more things.  I don't have any
> > > immediate use for it, but it doesn't seem completely far-fetched that
> > > there are some.
>
> > So something like %w[...%w] where people could put things like PROMPT1
> > inside?
>
> Hmm, (I'm not sure your proposed syntax works, but let's assume that
> it does.)  I'm saying you'd define
> \set PROMPT1 '%a%b%c '
> \set PROMPT2 '%w[%a%b%c %w]'
>
> and you'd end up with matching indentation on multiline queries.
>
> I'm not sure that we'd need to make something like this work:
>   PROMPT1="%w[$PROMPT1%w]"
> which I think is what you're saying.

PROMPT2="%w[$PROMPT1%w]", and basically yes.

> We already have "%:PROMPT1:" but that expands to the literal value of
> prompt1, not to the value that prompt1 would expand to:

Yeah, that's not so great for this usage.  I guess "expand variables"
could be a separate useful feature (and patch) all by itself...

Best,
David.
--
David Fetter <david(at)fetter(dot)org> http://fetter.org/
Phone: +1 415 235 3778

Remember to vote!
Consider donating to Postgres: http://www.postgresql.org/about/donate


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Kyotaro Horiguchi-4
At Wed, 13 Nov 2019 20:57:04 +0100, David Fetter <[hidden email]> wrote in

> On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:58:38PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:
> > On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
> >
> > > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 03:06:08PM -0300, Alvaro Herrera wrote:
> > > > On 2019-Nov-13, David Fetter wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 09:47:01AM -0500, Tom Lane wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > > > How about a circumfix directive (like the existing %[ ... %])
> > > > > > > that replaces everything inside with whitespace, but keeps the width?
> >
> > > > This seems way too specific to me.  I like the "circumfix" directive
> > > > better, because it allows one to do more things.  I don't have any
> > > > immediate use for it, but it doesn't seem completely far-fetched that
> > > > there are some.
> >
> > > So something like %w[...%w] where people could put things like PROMPT1
> > > inside?
> >
> > Hmm, (I'm not sure your proposed syntax works, but let's assume that
> > it does.)  I'm saying you'd define
> > \set PROMPT1 '%a%b%c '
> > \set PROMPT2 '%w[%a%b%c %w]'
> >
> > and you'd end up with matching indentation on multiline queries.

This seems assuming %x are a kind of stable (until semicolon)
function. But at least %`..` can be volatile.  So, I think the %w
thing in PROMPT2 should be able to refer the actual prompt string
resulted from PROMPT1.

> > I'm not sure that we'd need to make something like this work:
> >   PROMPT1="%w[$PROMPT1%w]"
> > which I think is what you're saying.
>
> PROMPT2="%w[$PROMPT1%w]", and basically yes.

Like this. Or may be a bit too-much and I don't came up with a
lialistic use-case, but I think of the following syntax.

\set PROMPT1 '%w[%a%b%c%w] '
\set PROMPT2 '%w '

where %w in PROMPT2 is replaced by a whitespace with the same length
to the output of %w[..%w] part in PROMPT1.

> > We already have "%:PROMPT1:" but that expands to the literal value of
> > prompt1, not to the value that prompt1 would expand to:
>
> Yeah, that's not so great for this usage.  I guess "expand variables"
> could be a separate useful feature (and patch) all by itself...

+1.

regards.

--
Kyotaro Horiguchi
NTT Open Source Software Center


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Tom Lane-2
Kyotaro Horiguchi <[hidden email]> writes:
> This seems assuming %x are a kind of stable (until semicolon)
> function. But at least %`..` can be volatile.  So, I think the %w
> thing in PROMPT2 should be able to refer the actual prompt string
> resulted from PROMPT1.

Oh, that's a good point.  But it actually leads to a much simpler
definition and implementation than the other ideas we've kicked
around: define %w as "whitespace equal to the length of the
last-generated PROMPT1 string (initially empty)", and we just
have to save PROMPT1 each time we generate it.

Except ... I'm not sure how to deal with hidden escape sequences.
We should probably assume that anything inside %[...%] has width
zero, but how would we remember that?

Maybe count the width of non-escape characters whenever we
generate PROMPT1, and just save that number not the string?
It'd add overhead that's useless when there's no %w, but
probably not enough to care about.

                        regards, tom lane


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Thomas Munro-5
On Fri, Nov 15, 2019 at 3:58 AM Tom Lane <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Kyotaro Horiguchi <[hidden email]> writes:
> > This seems assuming %x are a kind of stable (until semicolon)
> > function. But at least %`..` can be volatile.  So, I think the %w
> > thing in PROMPT2 should be able to refer the actual prompt string
> > resulted from PROMPT1.
>
> Oh, that's a good point.  But it actually leads to a much simpler
> definition and implementation than the other ideas we've kicked
> around: define %w as "whitespace equal to the length of the
> last-generated PROMPT1 string (initially empty)", and we just
> have to save PROMPT1 each time we generate it.
>
> Except ... I'm not sure how to deal with hidden escape sequences.
> We should probably assume that anything inside %[...%] has width
> zero, but how would we remember that?
>
> Maybe count the width of non-escape characters whenever we
> generate PROMPT1, and just save that number not the string?
> It'd add overhead that's useless when there's no %w, but
> probably not enough to care about.
Nice idea.  Here's one like that, that just does the counting at the
end and looks out for readline control codes.  It's pretty naive about
what "width" means though: you'll get two spaces for UTF-8 encoded é,
and I suppose a complete implementation would know about the half
width/full width thing for Chinese and Japanese etc.

0001-Allow-invisible-PROMPT2-in-psql.patch (4K) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Alvaro Herrera-9
On 2019-Nov-18, Thomas Munro wrote:

> Nice idea.  Here's one like that, that just does the counting at the
> end and looks out for readline control codes.  It's pretty naive about
> what "width" means though: you'll get two spaces for UTF-8 encoded é,
> and I suppose a complete implementation would know about the half
> width/full width thing for Chinese and Japanese etc.

Hmm ... is this related to what Juan José posted at
https://postgr.es/m/CAC+AXB28ADgwdNRA=aAoWDYPqO1DZR+5NTO8iXGSsFrXyVpqYQ@...
?  That's backend code of course, though.

--
Álvaro Herrera                https://www.2ndQuadrant.com/
PostgreSQL Development, 24x7 Support, Remote DBA, Training & Services


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Thomas Munro-5
On Mon, Nov 18, 2019 at 1:49 PM Alvaro Herrera <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 2019-Nov-18, Thomas Munro wrote:
> > Nice idea.  Here's one like that, that just does the counting at the
> > end and looks out for readline control codes.  It's pretty naive about
> > what "width" means though: you'll get two spaces for UTF-8 encoded é,
> > and I suppose a complete implementation would know about the half
> > width/full width thing for Chinese and Japanese etc.
>
> Hmm ... is this related to what Juan José posted at
> https://postgr.es/m/CAC+AXB28ADgwdNRA=aAoWDYPqO1DZR+5NTO8iXGSsFrXyVpqYQ@...
> ?  That's backend code of course, though.

Yeah.  Maybe pg_wcswidth() would be OK though, and it's available in
psql, though I guess you'd have to make a copy with the escaped bits
stripped out.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Tom Lane-2
Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:
> On Mon, Nov 18, 2019 at 1:49 PM Alvaro Herrera <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 2019-Nov-18, Thomas Munro wrote:
>>> Nice idea.  Here's one like that, that just does the counting at the
>>> end and looks out for readline control codes.  It's pretty naive about
>>> what "width" means though: you'll get two spaces for UTF-8 encoded é,
>>> and I suppose a complete implementation would know about the half
>>> width/full width thing for Chinese and Japanese etc.

> Yeah.  Maybe pg_wcswidth() would be OK though, and it's available in
> psql, though I guess you'd have to make a copy with the escaped bits
> stripped out.

Right, you should use pg_wcswidth() or the underlying PQdsplen() function
to compute display width.  The latter might be more convenient since
you could apply it character by character rather than making a copy
of the string.

                        regards, tom lane


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Thomas Munro-5
On Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 6:21 AM Tom Lane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:
> > Yeah.  Maybe pg_wcswidth() would be OK though, and it's available in
> > psql, though I guess you'd have to make a copy with the escaped bits
> > stripped out.
>
> Right, you should use pg_wcswidth() or the underlying PQdsplen() function
> to compute display width.  The latter might be more convenient since
> you could apply it character by character rather than making a copy
> of the string.

Right, a PQdsplen()/PQmblen() loop works nicely, as attached.

I spotted a potential problem: I suppose I could write a PROMPT1 that
includes an invalid multibyte sequence at the end of the buffer and
trick PQmblen() or PQdsplen() into reading a few bytes past the end.
Two defences against that would be (1) use pg_encoding_verifymb()
instead of PQmblen() and (2) use pg_encoding_max_length() to make sure
you can't get close enough to the end of the buffer, but neither of
those functions are available to psql.

v2-0001-Allow-invisible-PROMPT2-in-psql.patch (4K) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Tom Lane-2
Thomas Munro <[hidden email]> writes:
> Right, a PQdsplen()/PQmblen() loop works nicely, as attached.

> I spotted a potential problem: I suppose I could write a PROMPT1 that
> includes an invalid multibyte sequence at the end of the buffer and
> trick PQmblen() or PQdsplen() into reading a few bytes past the end.
> Two defences against that would be (1) use pg_encoding_verifymb()
> instead of PQmblen() and (2) use pg_encoding_max_length() to make sure
> you can't get close enough to the end of the buffer, but neither of
> those functions are available to psql.

You should follow the logic in pg_wcswidth: compute PQmblen() first,
and bail out if it's more than the remaining string length, otherwise
it's ok to apply PQdsplen().

It might be a good idea to explicitly initialize last_prompt1_width to
zero, for clarity.

Should the user docs explicitly say "of the same width as the most recent
output of PROMPT1", as you have in the comments?  That seems a more
precise specification, and it will eliminate some questions people will
otherwise ask.

LGTM otherwise.

                        regards, tom lane


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

Thomas Munro-5
On Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 12:09 PM Tom Lane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> You should follow the logic in pg_wcswidth: compute PQmblen() first,
> and bail out if it's more than the remaining string length, otherwise
> it's ok to apply PQdsplen().

Got it.  I was worried that it wasn't safe to call even PQmblen(),
because I didn't know a fact about all encodings: as described in the
comment of pg_gb18030_mblen(), all implementations read only the first
byte to determine the length, except for GB18030 which reads the
second byte too, and that's OK because there's always a null
terminator.

> It might be a good idea to explicitly initialize last_prompt1_width to
> zero, for clarity.
>
> Should the user docs explicitly say "of the same width as the most recent
> output of PROMPT1", as you have in the comments?  That seems a more
> precise specification, and it will eliminate some questions people will
> otherwise ask.
>
> LGTM otherwise.

Done, and pushed.  I also skipped negative results from PQdsplen like
pg_wcswidth() does (that oversight explained why a non-readline build
showed the correct alignment for PROMPT1 '%[%033[1m%]%M
%n@%/%R%[%033[0m%]%# ' by strange concindence).

Thanks all for the feedback.  I think the new bikeshed colour looks good.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Invisible PROMPT2

David Fetter
On Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 04:02:48PM +1300, Thomas Munro wrote:

> On Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 12:09 PM Tom Lane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > You should follow the logic in pg_wcswidth: compute PQmblen() first,
> > and bail out if it's more than the remaining string length, otherwise
> > it's ok to apply PQdsplen().
>
> Got it.  I was worried that it wasn't safe to call even PQmblen(),
> because I didn't know a fact about all encodings: as described in the
> comment of pg_gb18030_mblen(), all implementations read only the first
> byte to determine the length, except for GB18030 which reads the
> second byte too, and that's OK because there's always a null
> terminator.
>
> > It might be a good idea to explicitly initialize last_prompt1_width to
> > zero, for clarity.
> >
> > Should the user docs explicitly say "of the same width as the most recent
> > output of PROMPT1", as you have in the comments?  That seems a more
> > precise specification, and it will eliminate some questions people will
> > otherwise ask.
> >
> > LGTM otherwise.
>
> Done, and pushed.  I also skipped negative results from PQdsplen like
> pg_wcswidth() does (that oversight explained why a non-readline build
> showed the correct alignment for PROMPT1 '%[%033[1m%]%M
> %n@%/%R%[%033[0m%]%# ' by strange concindence).
>
> Thanks all for the feedback.  I think the new bikeshed colour looks good.
Please find attached some polka dots for the bike shed :)

Best,
David.
--
David Fetter <david(at)fetter(dot)org> http://fetter.org/
Phone: +1 415 235 3778

Remember to vote!
Consider donating to Postgres: http://www.postgresql.org/about/donate

v1-0001-Make-visible_length-available-to-the-rest-of-psql.patch (3K) Download Attachment
12