PgUS Diversity Initiatives Questionnaire

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PgUS Diversity Initiatives Questionnaire

Stacey Haysler
The PgUS Diversity Committee has compiled a Diversity Initiatives questionnaire to gather ideas from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives across open source technology communities. These ideas will form the basis for real change in the United States PostgreSQL Association's Diversity Committee, and will aid in providing resources for other organizations to rebuild and recreate their own communities that both uplift and are uplifted by diversity.

The questionnaire can be found at:

Your contribution of thoughts, knowledge, and time to this project through responding to these questions is valuable, and much appreciated.

Regards,
Stacey

Stacey Haysler
President, U.S. PostgreSQL Association
Call Me: Stacey
Pronouns: She/Her

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Re: PgUS Diversity Initiatives Questionnaire

Lætitia Avrot
Hi Stacey,

Thank you for this form.
I'm sorry that I have to admit I don't know how to help. I do think it would be great to match the diversity in the planet in our community, but I also think that as a white woman, I need to stop talking on the subject and begin to listen.

So, anyone out there if you have any idea how to help, please, fill in this form.

Have a nice day,

Lætitia

Le ven. 31 juil. 2020 à 07:51, Stacey Haysler <[hidden email]> a écrit :
The PgUS Diversity Committee has compiled a Diversity Initiatives questionnaire to gather ideas from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives across open source technology communities. These ideas will form the basis for real change in the United States PostgreSQL Association's Diversity Committee, and will aid in providing resources for other organizations to rebuild and recreate their own communities that both uplift and are uplifted by diversity.

The questionnaire can be found at:

Your contribution of thoughts, knowledge, and time to this project through responding to these questions is valuable, and much appreciated.

Regards,
Stacey

Stacey Haysler
President, U.S. PostgreSQL Association
Call Me: Stacey
Pronouns: She/Her



--
Paper doesn’t grow on trees. Please print responsibly.
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Re: PgUS Diversity Initiatives Questionnaire

Katherine Mcmillan
Hi there,

I really appreciated reading this questionnaire and the effort it took to create, it was thought-provoking.  However, I must echo Laetitia's thoughts and comment that I am at a loss in my ability to provide meaningful feedback, and feel there is listening needed.  Recently, I have been asked to reflect on my experience being the only female in an IT Support Program at a Canadian College.  When asked how to encourage more women to enter such a program, I felt totally stumped, and said so.  I did say "having a lack of role models doesn't help" but that was the best I could do. 

Something did catch my attention and had my wheels turning: a story in the National Geographic called "They Risk Their Lives to Save Elephants" (please see below for more details).  In anticipation of World Elephant Day next Wednesday (August 12) , I do wonder if we have a platform to highlight such exceptional dedication and achievements? While these efforts may not be directly towards the PostgreSQL project, I do feel that highlighting stories of female heroes and efforts to save the elephants may be helpful ways to empower those in our community who do not identify as male. I would be interested in others' thoughts.

Sincerely,
Katie
TODAY'S BIG TOPIC:
THEY RISK THEIR LIVES
TO SAVE ELEPHANTS
Thursday, August 6, 2020
PHOTOGRAPH BY BRENT STIRTON


By Rachael BaleANIMALS Executive Editor

With World Elephant Day next Wednesday, I’ve been thinking a lot about the people who risk their lives to protect them. In Zimbabwe, the Akashinga—an all-female, nonprofit, anti-poaching unit—is one of the most remarkable groups I’ve learned about.

Made up of local women from disadvantaged backgrounds—some of them orphaned by AIDS or victims of domestic violence—the Akashinga undergo special forces-type training and are charged with protecting a 115-square-mile wildlife area in the Zambezi Valley, which has lost thousands of elephants to poachers over the past 20 years. (Pictured above, ranger Petronella Chigumbura practicing reconnaissance techniques).

Founder Damien Mander, who has been training anti-poaching rangers in Africa for more than a decade, says female rangers tend to be far more successful than male rangers. They’re better at de-escalating potentially violent situations, are less likely to accept bribes from poachers, and usually invest as much as 90 percent of their income in their families, as opposed to 35 percent with men, Lindsay Smith wrote in a story about them last year.

Zimbabwe has lost about 11 percent of its elephants since 2005, and Africa overall loses some 8 percent of its savanna elephants each year, almost entirely to poaching for their ivory. Asian elephants continue to lose ground as well.

On World Elephant Day, National Geographic is raising awareness about the plight of elephants and the risks the Akashinga take to protect them. Nat Geo is premiering the documentary Akashinga: The Brave Ones, executive produced by James Cameron and streaming at akashinga.filmCheck out the trailer now. (Below, Akashinga rangers with an elephant at a watering hole.)




On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 3:33 AM Lætitia Avrot <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Stacey,

Thank you for this form.
I'm sorry that I have to admit I don't know how to help. I do think it would be great to match the diversity in the planet in our community, but I also think that as a white woman, I need to stop talking on the subject and begin to listen.

So, anyone out there if you have any idea how to help, please, fill in this form.

Have a nice day,

Lætitia

Le ven. 31 juil. 2020 à 07:51, Stacey Haysler <[hidden email]> a écrit :
The PgUS Diversity Committee has compiled a Diversity Initiatives questionnaire to gather ideas from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives across open source technology communities. These ideas will form the basis for real change in the United States PostgreSQL Association's Diversity Committee, and will aid in providing resources for other organizations to rebuild and recreate their own communities that both uplift and are uplifted by diversity.

The questionnaire can be found at:

Your contribution of thoughts, knowledge, and time to this project through responding to these questions is valuable, and much appreciated.

Regards,
Stacey

Stacey Haysler
President, U.S. PostgreSQL Association
Call Me: Stacey
Pronouns: She/Her



--
Paper doesn’t grow on trees. Please print responsibly.
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Re: PgUS Diversity Initiatives Questionnaire

Katherine Mcmillan
Hello all,

Just a few more links on this theme if interested:

How One Woman Escaped Her Violent Marriage To Join The World’s First All-Female Anti-Poaching Force

Save the Elephants
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
The Woman Saving Kenya's Elephants

Saving Elephants in a Digital World

Our Founder

Meet Thailand's Elephant Whisperer

Disrupting the Dominant Conservation Paradigm

One woman's mission to save orphaned elephants


Have-a-go heroes: the women saving elephants in their free time  

Save Nosey Now

"It’s no secret that elephants are a matriarchal society. The females form lifelong bonds with other females- they co-mother, sharing all of the responsibilities of child rearing. They also pass generational wisdom between elder “crone” elephants who know the ancient migration routes and can find water buried deep in the ground. Truly, female elephants represent the best of woman energy and it’s only natural that some of that “magic” would find its way into the hearts of we humans.

In the world of elephant rescue and conservation, we see on a daily basis, women all over the planet working night and day to save elephants! Women are leaving their careers, taking to social media, joining protests, sending donations, time and time again it is women that are doing the heavy lifting for elephants."

-Thyra Rutter, 2019 (Artist & Co-Founder of Arte for Elephants, a for purpose business that raises money for elephant sanctuaries around the world through the sale of art.)

https://www.arteforelephants.net/post/2019/03/08/crazy-elephant-ladies-lead-the-charge-to-save-endangered-elephants

 

♡ Ethereal ♡ Yes, if you had remembered how much I love Elephants, that they are my Spirit Animal, I wonder if you could have treated me so cruelly with your lies. Elephant Quotes, Elephant Love, Elephant Art, Elephant Stuff, African Elephant, Elephant Images, Elephant Pictures, Elephants Never Forget, Save The Elephants


On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 5:42 PM Katherine Mcmillan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi there,

I really appreciated reading this questionnaire and the effort it took to create, it was thought-provoking.  However, I must echo Laetitia's thoughts and comment that I am at a loss in my ability to provide meaningful feedback, and feel there is listening needed.  Recently, I have been asked to reflect on my experience being the only female in an IT Support Program at a Canadian College.  When asked how to encourage more women to enter such a program, I felt totally stumped, and said so.  I did say "having a lack of role models doesn't help" but that was the best I could do. 

Something did catch my attention and had my wheels turning: a story in the National Geographic called "They Risk Their Lives to Save Elephants" (please see below for more details).  In anticipation of World Elephant Day next Wednesday (August 12) , I do wonder if we have a platform to highlight such exceptional dedication and achievements? While these efforts may not be directly towards the PostgreSQL project, I do feel that highlighting stories of female heroes and efforts to save the elephants may be helpful ways to empower those in our community who do not identify as male. I would be interested in others' thoughts.

Sincerely,
Katie
TODAY'S BIG TOPIC:
THEY RISK THEIR LIVES
TO SAVE ELEPHANTS
Thursday, August 6, 2020
PHOTOGRAPH BY BRENT STIRTON


By Rachael BaleANIMALS Executive Editor

With World Elephant Day next Wednesday, I’ve been thinking a lot about the people who risk their lives to protect them. In Zimbabwe, the Akashinga—an all-female, nonprofit, anti-poaching unit—is one of the most remarkable groups I’ve learned about.

Made up of local women from disadvantaged backgrounds—some of them orphaned by AIDS or victims of domestic violence—the Akashinga undergo special forces-type training and are charged with protecting a 115-square-mile wildlife area in the Zambezi Valley, which has lost thousands of elephants to poachers over the past 20 years. (Pictured above, ranger Petronella Chigumbura practicing reconnaissance techniques).

Founder Damien Mander, who has been training anti-poaching rangers in Africa for more than a decade, says female rangers tend to be far more successful than male rangers. They’re better at de-escalating potentially violent situations, are less likely to accept bribes from poachers, and usually invest as much as 90 percent of their income in their families, as opposed to 35 percent with men, Lindsay Smith wrote in a story about them last year.

Zimbabwe has lost about 11 percent of its elephants since 2005, and Africa overall loses some 8 percent of its savanna elephants each year, almost entirely to poaching for their ivory. Asian elephants continue to lose ground as well.

On World Elephant Day, National Geographic is raising awareness about the plight of elephants and the risks the Akashinga take to protect them. Nat Geo is premiering the documentary Akashinga: The Brave Ones, executive produced by James Cameron and streaming at akashinga.filmCheck out the trailer now. (Below, Akashinga rangers with an elephant at a watering hole.)




On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 3:33 AM Lætitia Avrot <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Stacey,

Thank you for this form.
I'm sorry that I have to admit I don't know how to help. I do think it would be great to match the diversity in the planet in our community, but I also think that as a white woman, I need to stop talking on the subject and begin to listen.

So, anyone out there if you have any idea how to help, please, fill in this form.

Have a nice day,

Lætitia

Le ven. 31 juil. 2020 à 07:51, Stacey Haysler <[hidden email]> a écrit :
The PgUS Diversity Committee has compiled a Diversity Initiatives questionnaire to gather ideas from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives across open source technology communities. These ideas will form the basis for real change in the United States PostgreSQL Association's Diversity Committee, and will aid in providing resources for other organizations to rebuild and recreate their own communities that both uplift and are uplifted by diversity.

The questionnaire can be found at:

Your contribution of thoughts, knowledge, and time to this project through responding to these questions is valuable, and much appreciated.

Regards,
Stacey

Stacey Haysler
President, U.S. PostgreSQL Association
Call Me: Stacey
Pronouns: She/Her



--
Paper doesn’t grow on trees. Please print responsibly.