Re: Learning curves and such (was Re: [HACKERS] pgFoundry)

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Re: Learning curves and such (was Re: [HACKERS] pgFoundry)

Bruce Momjian-2
Andrew Dunstan wrote:

> Tom Lane said:
> > Greg Stark <[hidden email]> writes:
> >> Tom Lane <[hidden email]> writes:
> >>> What it comes down to is that a mailing list encourages many-eyes-on-
> >>> one-bug synergy, whereas Bugzilla is designed to send a bug report to
> >>> just one pair of eyes, or at most a small number of eyes.  I haven't
> >>> used RT but I doubt it's fundamentally different.
> >
> >> Actually RT is quite different. It's very closely tied to email. You
> >> get all the updates in email and can respond to the emails and the
> >> results are archived in the ticket.
> >
> > [ shrug... ] BZ sends me email too --- for the things *it* thinks I
> > should know about.
> >
> > The basic point here is that these systems are designed on the
> > assumption that there is a small, easily identified set of people
> > who need-to-know about any given problem.  We (Postgres) have done well
> > by *not* using that assumption, and I'm not eager to adopt a
> > tool that forces us to buy into that mindset.
> >
>
> Actually, when BZ sends you mail, it's acting on choices that you have made,
> or someone at RedHat has made for you. You have a lot of control over what
> it sends. You want all the email? Tell BZ and you should get it. By contrast
> with these fine-grained controls, a mailing list offers you one choice:
> subscribe or don't.

Right, if you classify the information coming in, you can set controls
over who sees it.  What we don't do now is any kind of classification.

--
  Bruce Momjian                        |  http://candle.pha.pa.us
  [hidden email]               |  (610) 359-1001
  +  If your life is a hard drive,     |  13 Roberts Road
  +  Christ can be your backup.        |  Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073

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Re: Learning curves and such (was Re: [HACKERS] pgFoundry)

Michael Glaesemann

On May 20, 2005, at 11:43 PM, Bruce Momjian wrote:

> Andrew Dunstan wrote:
>
>> Actually, when BZ sends you mail, it's acting on choices that you  
>> have made,
>> or someone at RedHat has made for you. You have a lot of control  
>> over what
>> it sends. You want all the email? Tell BZ and you should get it.  
>> By contrast
>> with these fine-grained controls, a mailing list offers you one  
>> choice:
>> subscribe or don't.
>>
>
> Right, if you classify the information coming in, you can set controls
> over who sees it.  What we don't do now is any kind of classification.

This may be a bit off-the-wall, but I recall Joel Spolsky recently  
writing about using Bayesian filtering to classify mail into groups  
other than spam/ham. I wonder if there's any use for something like  
that in this case.

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogBugzII.html

Michael Glaesemann
grzm myrealbox com


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Re: Learning curves and such (was Re: [HACKERS] pgFoundry)

Steve Atkins
On Fri, May 20, 2005 at 11:59:00PM +0900, Michael Glaesemann wrote:

> >Right, if you classify the information coming in, you can set controls
> >over who sees it.  What we don't do now is any kind of classification.
>
> This may be a bit off-the-wall, but I recall Joel Spolsky recently  
> writing about using Bayesian filtering to classify mail into groups  
> other than spam/ham. I wonder if there's any use for something like  
> that in this case.
>
> http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogBugzII.html

No, definitely not. Pseudo-bayesian classification as used by the more
optimistic spam-filtering folks is pretty crappy at the best of times,
and it's really unusuable for more than 3-4 categories.

There are natural language analysis techniques that'll do this sort of
thing, but they're in the realms of research projects, not canned
tools.

Cheers,
  Steve


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